CW Atlanta Events

John McLaughlin & Jimmy Herring: Meeting of the Spirits

Wednesday

Nov 22, 2017 – 7:00 PM

1280 Peachtree St
Atlanta, GA 30309 Map

  • John McLaughlin
  • Jimmy Herring
  • Jon McLaughlin

More Info

John McLaughlin: One of fusion's most virtuosic guitar soloists, John McLaughlin placed his blazing speed in the service of a searching spiritual passion that has kept his music evolving and open to new influences. Whether shredding on electric, or simmering quietly on acoustic, McLaughlin's intensity and under-appreciated versatility nearly always kept his playing vital, and his best moments -- whether as a solo artist or bandmember -- represent some of fusion's greatest recordings. McLaughlin was born January 4, 1942, in Yorkshire, England, and began playing guitar at age 11. Initially attracted to blues and swing, he worked with British artists like Georgie Fame, Graham Bond, Brian Auger, and Ginger Baker. McLaughlin formed his own band in 1968, and recorded the excellent debut Extrapolation in early 1969. Later that year, he moved to New York to join Tony Williams' groundbreaking fusion band Lifetime, and appeared on the classic Emergency! Through Williams, McLaughlin was invited to join Miles Davis' band, and became an important part of fusion landmarks like In a Silent Way, Bitches Brew, and A Tribute to Jack Johnson. In 1970, wanting to explore acoustic and Eastern music, McLaughlin recorded the classic My Goal's Beyond; he soon left Davis, and after one further solo album, Devotion, McLaughlin spent some time woodshedding. He re-emerged in 1971 as leader of the Mahavishnu Orchestra, a seminal band that did much to define and popularize early jazz-rock fusion. Pausing to record Love, Devotion and Surrender with Carlos Santana in 1972, McLaughlin led Mahavishnu until 1975. Returning to spiritual preoccupations on My Goal's Beyond, he then formed Shakti, which fused acoustic jazz with Indian music over the course of three albums. McLaughlin returned to his solo career in the late '70s, forming a backing outfit called the One Truth Band, and also recording the guitar-trio albums Friday Night in San Francisco and Passion, Grace and Fire with fellow fusion burners Al DiMeola and Paco DeLucia. As the '80s went along, McLaughlin experimented with classical/jazz-hybrid composing; there was also a short-lived Mahavishnu reunion in the mid-'80s. McLaughlin has continued to record steadily in both electric and acoustic settings.

Jimmy Herring: .. .. ..They say, “It ain’t braggin’ if you can do it.” Jimmy Herring is too modest to brag, but his guitar does a lot of the talkin’. And with the release of his first solo recording, .. Lifeboat,.. people are going to hear what Jimmy and his guitar have to say. Jimmy Herring is known for his limitless improvisations , long flowing phrases, and highly charged (and always very soulful) lead work. ..Lifeboat ..features Jimmy’s fiery guitar playing, and six Herring originals that showcase his stylistically diverse songwriting. .. Jimmy Herring developed his reputation as a unique guitar player from years of performing and recording with top-tier musicians. After playing on the local scene of his hometown of Fayetteville, North Carolina, Jimmy attended and graduated from the Guitar Institute of Technology. In 1986, Jimmy moved to Atlanta, Georgia to teach at the Atlanta Institute of Music and quickly established himself. Herring still lives in Atlanta with his wife and two children. .. In 1989, Jimmy joined singer and bandleader Col. Bruce Hampton and his group Aquarium Rescue Unit – a seminal jam band which mixed rock, free-jazz and bluegrass – and stayed until 1996. From 1998-99, nationwide exposure would come to Jimmy with the band Jazz Is Dead; which also featured drummer Billy Cobham (Mahavishnu Orchestra), bassist Alphonso Johnson (Weather Report), and keyboardist T Lavitz (The Dregs). This group was known for playing jazz-fusion instrumental interpretations of classic songs by The Grateful Dead. Billy Cobham calls Jimmy Herring, “One of the best I have ever played with.” .. Jimmy then played with The Allman Brothers Band for a summer tour in 2000. After the death of guitar great Jerry Garcia, The Grateful Dead’s bass player Phil Lesh continued to tour under the name Phil Lesh & Friends. Herring was a full-time member of this group from October 2000 to November 2005. In 2003 and 04 the surviving members of The Grateful Dead reunited and Herring was asked to fill the guitar chair. .. Throughout this time, Jimmy Herring has continued to play in various side projects, notably Project Z with Jeff Sipe (drums) and Ricky Keller (bass). ..Lincoln Memorial, .. the second Project Z recording, was released in the fall of 2005. August 2006 found Jimmy taking over the guitar spot in the hugely popular jam band Widespread Panic; a gig that he continues to this present time. .. With ..Lifeboat, ..Jimmy Herring is poised to move from sideman to the center of the stage. Lifeboat is a wide-ranging work. From foot stomping southern-flavored rockers; to modern bop and fusion; to a cover of the Wayne Shorter composition “Lost”; and melodic pieces full of subtlety and nuance; the music of ..Lifeboat .. allows Jimmy to express a full-range of emotions through his guitar. .. ..Lifeboat .. will amaze people discovering Jimmy Herring for the first time…and surprise long-time fans as well.

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.. Jimmy Herring - The Lifeboat Story (2008) .. .. Put this video on your website. Copy the code below .. ...... ..

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.. Widespread Panic Tourdates .. .... Jimmy on the road. Where ? ..



Jon McLaughlin: A great deal has happened to Jon McLaughlin between the release of his debut Island Records album Indiana last year, and his new, sophomore effort, Ok Now.

When we last saw him, the 25-year-old singer/songwriter was giving a show-stopping performance of the Oscar-nominated "So Close," the song he sang in the hit Disney movie Enchanted, on the worldwide telecast of the 80th Annual Academy Awards ceremony.

The appearance re-ignited Indiana, spurring a 1,514% overnight sales increase at Amazon, sending it to the 1 spot on its Movers & Shakers chart, and creating solid momentum for his latest release. The single from Indiana, "Beautiful Disaster" attracted over 420,000 digital fans when featured as Download of The Week.

And after getting major touring slots with Sara Bareilles, Paolo Nutini and Kelly Clarkson, along with dates with Colbie Caillat, Duffy and One Republic under his belt, Jon McLaughlin hit his stride on the road.

Flushed with that success, McLaughlin entered an L.A. recording studio last year intent on undergoing both a musical and stylistic transformation. The heartland piano player expanded his palette by working with new producer John Fields (Rooney, Jonas Brothers, Lifehouse, Switchfoot), co-writing with the likes of Jason Reeves (Colbie Callait's "Bubbly") as well as writer/producers Tricky and The-Dream (Rihanna's "Umbrella"), Troy Verges (Kenny Chesney's "You Save Me") and Brett James (Carrie Underwood's "Jesus, Take The Wheel").

McLaughlin admits the experience of appearing in Enchanted and performing on the Oscar telecast was a career-defining moment.

"The whole thing has taken on a life of its own," he says. "I wasn't even supposed to be in the movie. I love Disney ballads, but I didn't necessarily connect it to what I do as an artist. But that image of an old-school crooner inspired me. I was able to see myself as something different, which helped me open up to try new things on this album. I wasn't afraid to try on some new looks, either."

Jon describes himself as a "child of the '80s" in talking about the musical direction of Ok Now, with the very first single "Beating My Heart" the perfect example, an introspective, existential tune about nothing less than the meaning of life, with an elaborate pop-rock production that evokes Coldplay, thanks to soaring synths and a crackling backbeat.

With producer Fields playing bass, drums, slide guitar and a variety of other instruments, McLaughlin also enlisted the talents of ace players such as guitarists Tim Pierce and David Ryan Harris, as well as drummer Dorian Crozier in the studio.

Jon describes "You Can Never Go Back," which he co-wrote with acclaimed L.A. singer/songwriter Bleu, as his attempt to write a "late-'70s, early-'80s Billy Joel song," an admonition to not dwell on the past that evokes the blue-eyed soul of the Bee Gees crossed with Hall and Oates, buttressed by Fields' George Harrison-like slide guitar riffs.

McLaughlin's soul/R&B croon also characterizes "Things That You Say," a bittersweet song about "loneliness, the isolation you feel when you're trying to connect with anybody, but end up with these shallow, going-through-the-motions relationships instead."

Synthesizers introduce "You Are the One I Love," a song Jon co-wrote with Jason Reeves, inspired by the tabloid reports about Amy Winehouse's stormy relationship with her husband Blake that shows an empathy to the beleaguered pair. The multi-layered production is driven home by Peter Gabriel-like tribal drum rhythms.

"I feel for them," McLaughlin admits. "Who's to say any of our relationships are any less dysfunctional? I think it's cool that they're so madly in love."

"The Middle" is about being able to take the Hoosier kid out of Indiana, but not being able to take Indiana out of the Hoosier. The youngster who grew up in a conservative Midwestern household admits home is where his heart still remains: "Let me tell you now where I went wrong/Hollywood is just another place/I don't belong."

"Four Years" is another Billy Joel-style, tongue-in-cheek take on a '50s rocker about high school peer pressure that advises freshmen not to worry about the dictates of fashion.

"You just spend so much time worrying about stupid stuff that just doesn't matter," says McLaughlin, who insists his own high school years were pretty good. "I wish I could get back all the money I spent on Abercrombie and Fitch back then. If I heard this song when I was still in high school, I still don't think it would change anything. You can't change high school kids' minds about these things...but I'm still going to try."

"We All Need Saving," a song about the importance of friendship, starts with a stack of Beach Boys-styled street corner doo-wop oooh-oooh harmonies McLaughlin recorded late one night on Garageband.com, which gives the song its sacred feel, while "Throw My Love Around" counsels that, with only one life left to live, it's preferable to take risks then end up having regrets.

That same spirit of taking chances informed the making of Ok Now.

"My philosophy has changed," nods McLaughlin. "Now I believe you should get crazy in the studio, explore different sounds, and I love the challenge of recreating the songs in the live setting –that's the best part."

Ok Now is OK to go.

http://www.myspace.com/jonmclaughlin

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